A Fossil Paradise

SUMMARY: This is a video showing visitors participating in a guided hike to the Burgess Shale in Yoho National Park with a Parks Canada interpreter. The video shows the landscapes of Yoho National Park and fossils of the Burgess Shale. (3:36)

The Burgess Shale – a fossil paradise
TEXT: The Burgess Shale – a fossil paradise

The world's most important fossil find
TEXT: The world's most important fossil find

Diversity – Evolution – Exquisite preservation
TEXT: Diversity – Evolution – Exquisite preservation

1909 – Charles D. Walcott discovered the Burgess Shale
TEXT: 1909 – Charles D. Walcott discovered the Burgess Shale

He collected over 65000 specimens
TEXT: He collected over 65000 specimens

Parks Canada interpreter, Claudia Harding.
DESCRIPTION: Parks Canada interpreter, Claudia Harding.

"Join us for a guided hike to the Burgess Shale in Yoho National Park and spend a day with a Parks Canada interpreter."

A Parks Canada guide speaks to visitors on a guided hike.
DESCRIPTION: A Parks Canada guide speaks to visitors on a guided hike.

"One of the things that we'll see when we get up to the quarry is we'll see a real amazing diversity of body plans. So we see creatures that were predators, creatures that would have been scavengers, creatures that were at the very bottom of the food chain, and animals with all kinds of defensive techniques."

Hikers high five upon reaching the Burgess Shale quarry.
DESCRIPTION:  Guided hikers examine fossils at a Burgess Shale site.

"A visit to the Burgess Shale is very special because you really get to be hands on with the rock, to step into a little bit of history and see some spectacular fossils and do it in a fantastic surrounding. I mean, one of the most beautiful spots on the planet."

Guided hikers examine fossils at a Burgess Shale site.
DESCRIPTION: Hikers high five upon reaching the Burgess Shale quarry.

"So the mountains are young but falling apart. But the Burgess Shale fossils are ancient. Half a billion years old and still perfectly preserved waiting for us to come and see."

A guided hiker makes rubbings of a fossil at a Burgess Shale site
DESCRIPTION: A guided hiker makes rubbings of a fossil at a Burgess Shale site.

"This is more than what I expected. I didn't really expect that much other than a long hike, but it has it's benefits and it's definitely been nice to stop and enjoy the scenery and especially to get up here and kind of look around for fossils and stuff like that. You really feel like you're doing something and you're not just behind a velvet rope you're really touching and feeling it ‐ it's really fun."

A guided hiker describes his experience
DESCRIPTION: A guided hiker describes his experience

"I'm very surprised that there is so much, that they are so old and that you can see them everywhere."

A guided hiker holds her camera at a Burgess Shale site
DESCRIPTION: A guided hiker holds her camera at a Burgess Shale site

"I'm very surprised that there is so much, that they are so old and that you can see them everywhere."

A guided hiker describes her experience
DESCRIPTION: A guided hiker describes her experience

"It's amazing. It's almost humbling that this is almost half a billion years old, and it's still here and we can see it and experience it. And this is the start of life that's you and me today. You expect to see maybe half a dozen, and there are just everywhere, all the fossils."

BURGESS SHALE Yoho National Park 505 million years of history. A full day of discoveries.
TEXT: BURGESS SHALE Yoho National Park 505 million years of history.

Parks Canada interpreter describes how to find more information
DESCRIPTION: Parks Canada interpreter, Claudia Harding, describes how to find more information.

"For more information, visit our website at pc.gc.ca/burgessshale"

Burgess Shale . Yoho National Park. www.pc.gc.ca/burgessshale
TEXT: Burgess Shale. Yoho National Park. www.pc.gc.ca/burgessshale